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Multimedia


Designer.

Artist.


 

 

 

 

Storyteller.

 

 

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Multimedia


Designer.

Artist.


 

 

 

 

Storyteller.

 

 

 

 

My name is Rachel Minji Lee and I am a content creator in Seattle with a passion for science communication. I used to worry about defining what kind of creative professional I was.

These days, I worry less, and, instead, pursue challenging projects that resonate with me.

 

 

Multimedia Storytelling

While there is a vibrant food culture in Seattle that embodies some aspects of the more national “locavore” movement—as well as the consumption of sustainably produced foods— there is a need to go beyond a general awareness, and Green Grub Seattle’s mission is to showcase the diverse ways in which the food producers, vendors, and consumers in Seattle actively participate in a local/sustainable food system.

 

PART 1: Located in downtown West Seattle, Mashiko is widely known for its delicious and sustainable sushi. In this video, Hajime Sato, the owner and head chef at Mashiko, shares his story about his shift from traditional to sustainable sushi.

 

 

PART 2: Hajime Sato of Mashiko, a sustainable sushi restaurant, is an advocate of the sea-to-table movement. Here, hosts a special dinner that features seafood products that are not usually used in restaurants. From chum salmon and bloodline from a tuna, to a bait fish called blue runner, the ingredients generally fall under the category of "trash fish."

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Fine Art


Fine Art


Fine Art

 

Some people make art to express themselves.

I make art for conversations.

 

 

Solo Exhibition: Underpinnings

‘Climate change’ calls to mind images of increasingly severe wildfires and droughts and stranded polar bears, but there are devastating changes taking place beneath the surface of the seas due to ocean acidification (sometimes referred to as ‘global warming’s evil twin’ in the media), the mostly invisible and cataclysmic effects of which will reverberate through marine ecosystems as well as human communities worldwide.

In this debut show, Rachel Lee, an interdisciplinary artist with a keen interest in the sciences as well as contemporary drawing and painting, visually highlights recent findings about the many ocean species being impacted by the changing ocean chemistry, from familiar oysters and corals, to the fascinating and alien world of the microscopic zooplankton that line the foundation of ocean food webs.
 

Thesis Exhibition: Scatterfold

 

As one of the graduating fine art seniors at Pomona College, I presented a series of works in a joint exhibition. It offered me the opportunity to share my musings about our cultural obsession with post-apocalyptic narratives. In addition to the salon gallery featuring mixed media works and the large scale still life, there was a chair where a visitor could sit and read through an artist-made book.

 

 
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Game Design



AdaptNation is a collaborative, turn-based board game for 3-6 players, and takes place starting in the year 2025. Each player leads a fictional city and together they form a nation. Players must work together through trade, preparation, and investment to balance resources and keep their cities running in the face of progressively severe climate change over the next 30 years. The core play of resource/risk management is reflective of real climate risk management.

 

 

Game Design



AdaptNation is a collaborative, turn-based board game for 3-6 players, and takes place starting in the year 2025. Each player leads a fictional city and together they form a nation. Players must work together through trade, preparation, and investment to balance resources and keep their cities running in the face of progressively severe climate change over the next 30 years. The core play of resource/risk management is reflective of real climate risk management.

 

 

Game Design

Games aren't just for kids.

 

IN : HABIT

 

IN:HABIT is a concept for an app designed for mobile platforms. It helps the user track how much relative carbon emissions they are "saving" on their journey to making more sustainable choices. The game rewards you with a carbon currency, with which the user can purchase a wide array of trees or coral to populate their ecosystems. The more abundant and biodiverse your ecosystem is, the more likely it is that the user will encounter rare creatures...of which they can then snap a photo and upload to social media accounts for bragging rights.

 

 
 
 

AdaptNation

 

Games and other interactive media are particularly suited for teaching about climate change as it allows players to inhabit complex systems (to understand their current or potential role in transforming them), and meaningfully engage with them in a way that is both serious and fun. 

AdaptNation was an entry for the national Climate Game Jam, a 48-hour game development challenge in the manner of hackathons, hosted by the White House Office of Science & Technology Policy. The focus of this year's inaugural challenge was to develop a game that addresses adapting to climate change.

Submission video at Vimeo. Created by Rachel Lee, William Chen, and Rob Thompson at the University of Washington site. This game placed 3rd in the adult division of the competition. Update art assets viewable here

*Update (Jan 2016) : Game was presented at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History on Jan 18th and 21st.

 
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Science Comm


 

 

Science Comm


 

 

 

Science Illustration

 

Hydropower Illustrations

 

"The Vizzies"

 

The Visualization Challenge hosted by the National Science Foundation and Popular Science celebrates how visual media can clearly and accessibly communicate scientific research. Winning entries to previous years' competitions successfully demonstrate how photographs, videos, illustrations, and apps can help articulate ideas that don't translate well verbally, provide a "wow factor" to generate excitement about topics that may be ordinarily overlooked, and allow the general public to engage with research in ways that traditional science communication does not. For instance, in the 2015 challenge, a neuroscientist-turned-cartoonist made a graphic novels about the connectivity of our brains and a mechanical engineering lab at BYU created this video to show how origami has been—and continue to be—used widely as design inspiration for engineering.

 

 

My entry for the 2016 competition, an illustrative poster that is meant to hang in science classrooms or labs, was one of the finalists for the poster category.. It introduces the fruit fly as a versatile model organism and discusses some basic biological concepts in an accessible way. Some of the names are simple and humorous; others exemplify molecular biological principles; and still others are great for starting conversations about controversial issues. The simple design and palette—and fun illustrations—make this graphic appealing and accessible to the general public.

Read the text at a larger format image here. 

 

 
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Design


Design


Design

 

 

Logo Design

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Personal Logo

Commissioned by SleightlyMusical 

 

Poster Design